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Heat-control in Nano-devices

Full-fledged theory of thermoelectricity at nanoscale

Heat-control in Nano-devices
Heat-control in Nano-devices

18/09/2017

In this contribution, Karki and Kiselev provide an explanation of a long-standing puzzle of mysterious plateaus in thermoelectric transport through Kondo nano-devices.  Efficient control of heat flow through nano-sized quantum devices (single-electron transistors, quantum diodes) is one of the important directions of modern quantum technologies and quantum computing. For example, a quantum dot (one of promising realizations of the single electron transistor) is typically sandwiched between two electrodes (source and drain: Figure, left panel) and therefore accessible through quantum tunneling effects. Besides, at very low temperatures, electrons carry both charge and heat serving as a driving force of thermoelectric phenomena. Assuming that the source and the drain are biased by an external electric potential and characterized by two different temperatures (Figure, right panel), both scattering and interactions in the quantum dot develop at out-of-equilibrium conditions. The involvement of strong electron-electron interactions and resonance scattering demands a non-perturbative treatment of the problem. In a recent Rapid Communication (D.B. Karki and M.N. Kiselev, Thermoelectric transport through SU(N) Kondo Impurity, Phys. Rev. B 96, 121403(R) (2017)) the authors constructed a new approach to the quantum thermoelectric transport through nano-devices based on non-equilibrium many-body theory. This approach allowed for a mapping of a model of quantum-spin-impurity onto a Fermi system which scatters and interacts at the quantum dot position. It was shown that non-linear temperature and bias voltage effects play an important role at very low temperatures.

 

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